Games chief weighs into comment over Jones conditioning

CALLING criticism of Leisel Jones’s conditioning ”disgraceful”, the Olympic team’s chef de mission, Nick Green, mounted an impassioned defence of the eight-time Games medallist whom he said has been unfairly targeted on the eve of her record-breaking fourth Olympics.

Opening his daily media conference in London yesterday morning with the most impassioned statement of his tenure, Green said Jones had the full support of the team.

”She’s a triple Olympic gold medallist and a winner of eight Olympic medals for this country. I think she deserves a lot more respect than she was given.

”I’m pleased that there’s been unanimous support for Leisel Jones by her fellow competitors, by other athletes. I’ve seen comments from Cathy Freeman, Giaan Rooney, Libby Trickett,” Green said.

”It’s just unfair that she has been targeted this way on the eve of what, for her, is an historic competition. It’s her fourth Olympic Games. She is the only female ever in swimming to go to four Olympic Games.”

In an episode that could influence Green’s task of selecting a flag bearer for the opening ceremony tomorrow night – he has consistently raised Jones among the candidates – the team boss said the 26-year-old swimmer was a model Olympian who deserved the utmost respect.

Asked if there were ever reasonable grounds to criticise the physique of top athletes, Green responded: ”I think you’ve got to respect that athletes prepare for four years for this occasion. And athletes come in different shapes and sizes.

”It’s your performance … which is absolutely paramount.

”Athletes don’t come to an Olympic Games on a holiday. They just don’t. And Leisel is a superb athlete; a triple Olympic gold medallist and she’s won eight medals for this country over four Olympic Games. She knows what she is doing, and she is preparing in the right way. Everyone in the team supports her 100 per cent.”

Green even implored the Australian media contingent to get behind the national team.

”The athletes, to be at this level of competition, need to eliminate any distractions from their daily preparation … So allow the athletes to get on and do what they need to do.”

Two-time Olympic gold medallist Kieren Perkins staunchly defended Jones’s appearance. ”We spend far too much time worrying about the aesthetics of bodies without appreciating the unique physical traits that allow someone to do the extraordinary things that they do,” he said.

China’s Shanda Games takes majority ownership of eFusion MMOG

By James Brightman

China's Shanda Games takes majority ownership of eFusion MMOG

Wed 25 Jul 2012 2:40pm GMT / 10:40am EDT / 7:40am PDT
BusinessOnline

The online games publisher is looking to boost its overseas strategy

Eschborn, Germany-based eFusion MMOG GmbH announced today that Chinese online games publisher Shanda Games has purchased a majority stake in the company (financial terms were not disclosed). At the same time, eFusion just announced that it’s entered into an agreement with Eyedentity Games, a Korean online game development studio for the exclusive license to operate its action MMORPG Dragon Nest in Europe.

Shanda views the move as an important step in shoring up its overseas business. The company said it “has a strong intention to enhance its presence in the European market, where its influence remains relatively modest compared to other regions of the world.”

With the Shanda investment, eFusion noted that it will now “have all of the capital it needs in order to level up its position in the MMO games market.” The next step for the publisher will be to launch Dragon Nest across Europe.

Michael Lim, founder and CEO of eFusion MMOG GmbH, commented, “We are really delighted to become part of Shanda Games and are also excited about the tremendous opportunity to offer Dragon Nest, a skill based high-quality MMORPG, to European gamers. Launching Dragon Nest in Europe will be a huge milestone for us, but most of all, we’re looking forward to Dragon Nest attracting lots of fans among European gamers. The online game market in Europe is growing very fast but the competition is becoming tougher. We are ready to face the challenge and to build on eFusion MMOG’s success in this market.”

About the author

James Brightman
James Brightman has been covering the games industry since 2003 and has been an avid gamer since the days of Atari and Intellivision. He was previously EIC and co-founder of IndustryGamers and spent several years leading GameDaily Biz prior to that.

Online exclusive | Wanna bet? Gambling on the Olympics

Ladbrokes, another British bookmaker, will offer 11,000 different wagers during the games, according to spokeswoman Jessica Bridge. Those bets include that the Olympics will be over budget, that a British athlete will be photographed eating a McDonald’s Big Mac, or that the athletes village in Olympic Park will run out of condoms.

William Hill offers perhaps the longest odds of the games: 1,000-to-1 that a flying saucer will appear over Olympic Stadium during Friday’s opening ceremony. Tough luck, presumably, if aliens don’t make first contact until the next day.

Other longshots get slightly better odds, like 250-to-1 that every team in the 4×400-meter relay final drops the baton, or 33-to-1 that flamboyant London Mayor Boris Johnson accidentally lights his hair on fire with the Olympic torch.

And this being famously soggy London, of course they are taking bets on the weather, paying even-money that rain will mar the opening night. If that’s not enough to make an Olympic fan cry, Ladbrokes will pay $50 on a $1 bet that it will rain every day, and 10-to-1 that a strike by transit workers will halt train service on the London Underground.

But the gambling story is not all fun and games.

The British betting industry is worth $9 billion a year, one of the biggest in the world, according to a 2010 study by accounting and consultancy firm Deloitte. Most houses offer online gambling as well.

There have been fears that the massive gambling volume could lead to corruption, which would forever mar London’s legacy. The IOC has barred athletes from betting on the games – and sports, police and gambling industry officials plan to meet daily to ensure that no illegal bets are placed.

Jacques Rogge, the president of the International Olympic Committee, has said previously that illegal betting can fuel the scourge of match-fixing.

Crilly said the betting industry is heavily regulated and immediately reports suspicious activity to Britain’s Gambling Commission.

“We have a lot of strict regulations in place to guard against any funny business,” Crilly said. “If we were to see an unusually large bet for a sport we were not particularly expecting large amounts of money for, it would flash up … If there was any suggestion that it was suspicious we would get authorities involved.”

The most heavily wagered event during the London games is expected to be the 100-meter dash, where Jamaican Usain Bolt, the reigning Olympic champion, is still the odds-on favorite despite a rough run-up to the games that saw him bested in trials by countryman Yohan Blake. Soccer will also be an extremely popular wager, as will the women’s heptathlon, where star British athlete Jessica Ennis is expected to compete for gold.

A major challenge for the gambling houses is setting the odds for the more obscure sports. Who is to say Dutch rider Adelinde Cornelissen should be a 15-to-8 shot in dressage, an equestrian discipline? Or if Sweden’s Anders Gustafsson should be set as a 9-to-1 shot in the 1,000-meter men’s single kayak race?

Crilly says ahead of the Olympics, betting firms assign teams to research each sport, spending weeks immersing themselves in facts and figures.

Punters can also bet on which country will win the overall medals table (the U.S. is favored, with China a close second), or how many golds the host nation will take home.

Bridge says Ladbrokes has already taken a 10,000 pound ($15,500) bet on Bolt to win the 100-meter dash and expects much larger wagers ahead of the big race.

“We anticipate our high roller customers will fancy him to do the business,’ she said. “If they were to want 50,000 pounds ($77,500) or more on Bolt, then we will happily lay it.”

Britannia NutriChoice’s healthy online ‘Olympic’ games

New Delhi, July 25 (IANS) Home-grown global processed food and snacks major Britannia Industries has launched a 40-day, event-packed online pastime — “Game for Health” — coinciding with the London Olympics, under its popular brand NutriChoice.

“As our athletes prepare to excel at the summer games in London, we want all Indians to also take a pledge for health, and participate in a set of health-games designed to fit their daily routine,” the company said in a statement.

The company said the 40 days of fun-filled and easy-to-beat games, that are packed into five major events, are sure to push the players to their limits and keep them on their feet. Just tune in to http://www.ihealthu.com/gameforhealth.

“The big idea we cracked at the start of our journey with Britannia NutriChoice was ‘I Health U’,” said Sandip Maiti, chief executive of Britannia for experience commerce. The version two (2.0) of the game is also accessible on the move, using Android phones.

“‘Game for Health’ is fun campaign to start your journey to good health. We’ve gamified health, and peppered it with flavour of Olympics to set the context with upcoming summer games,” he said.

“We hope this campaign will help draw in millions of users who are active online and who are constantly seeking new ways to get started on the road to health.”

The game is built on the philosophy that staying healthy has been a challenge because of the obstacle of excuses. With an alarming increase in the number of lifestyle diseases, the idea is to demonstrate how to achieve good health with simple daily activities.

“The ‘Game for Health’ campaign is among the first to focus solely on health as an achievable target for all — a platform that motivates everyday Indians to kick-start their health goals, which have long been on the back burner,” said the company.

“We have always blamed our lack of achievement in sports to unhealthy eating and living habits of Indians. Through gamification of health, NutriChoice wants to demonstrate these are just excuses and we can be a healthier nation by doing simple things.”

NutriChoice is, accordingly, reaching out to those who want join the journey to health, using social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest by motivating them with tips, recipes and even live chat with nutritionist to answer myriad queries.

“Finally, Britannia NutriChoice, with its promise of adding goodness to one’s life through healthy snacking options, attempts to make healthy living a simple and fun with ‘Game for Health’.”

How to play: Pick a game, finish it and earn a health badge. Earn as many of them as 25 top contestants with maximum health badges win a gold medal each, a health kit and earn the title NutriChoice Health Champ. Also, 30 lucky players win additional health kits.

Let the games begin!

Your guide to the Olympics on TV

Switched on Olympic Tv

The Nine Network’s Olympic broadcasting team: Mark Nicholas, Ken Sutcliffe, Leila McKinnon and Cameron Williams. Picture: Nic Gibson
Source: National Features




THE most comprehensive television coverage is on Foxtel, which has eight dedicated channels running 24 hours a day in HD and SD, with every Gold Medal event to be shown live and in full.


Over the course of the Games, Foxtel will broadcast 3200 hours of sport, with about 1100 of these hours live.

Every single minute of the swimming, equestrian, canoe slalom and sprint, diving, rowing, gymnastics, athletics track, triathlon, weightlifting and cycling will be seen live and in full; the men’s and women’s road race will be seen live and uninterrupted; every single Australian men’s and women’s preliminary basketball match will be shown live and in full; and a total of 56 hockey matches will be shown in full.

Subscribers with iQ or iQHD can remotely record any event using the online TV guide. And Foxtel has released a tablet app providing remote access to all eight channels and enabling viewers to re-watch anything already  broadcast over wi-fi or 3G. 

NINE

On each of the 16 competition days, Nine will deliver 14 1/2 hours of continuous live coverage from 6.30pm until 9am the following morning. Then from 9am to 11am each morning, all the day’s highlights will be shown and later replayed from 4pm-6pm. 

The 300 hours of coverage will be broadcast on Channel 9 and simulcast in high definition on GEM. 

Viewers with a 3D-enabled television and aerial in metropolitan areas and on the Gold Coast will be able to watch up to five hours of 3D Olympic Games action daily.

The 3D package will follow London Gold at 11am on the allocated 3D channel 95. Viewers will need to rescan their TV tuners to access the channel. 

It features the opening ceremony and events including the swimming finals, gymnastics, athletics, canoe slalom, synchronised swimming and diving, and concludes each day with a one-hour highlights program.

Ken Sutcliffe from Wide World of Sports will host Nine’s London coverage along with Karl Stefanovic, Leila McKinnon, Mark Nicholas and Cameron Williams.

 

 

 

Pub brainwave puts Aussies in the game


{ story.summary|safe|escape }

  • Pinion co-founders (L-R) Daniel Ringland, Karl Flores and David Banham at the E3 gaming expo.

  • The show Dexter gets a plug via Pinion in Counter-Strike: Source.

  • A Pinion ad for the film Green Lantern appears in the game Counter-Strike.

  • A video ad for Hotmail in the game Day of Defeat.

See your ad here

Three Australian mates reckon they’ve worked out how to make advertising in video games work – and investors have backed them to the tune of just under $2 million.

It started as an idea in a pub three years ago, when Sydneysiders Daniel Ringland, Karl Flores and David Banham wondered whether they could create an advertising network targeting an audience of online gamers.

Tomorrow, Ringland, 30, and Flores, 32, are off to Seattle to set up Pinion‘s US office while Banham, 26, stays back in Australia to build out the engineering team (currently two people but increasing to four).

Early this year, after ups and downs turning the concept into reality, they signed Valve, one of the world’s largest game developers, as a partner. This has helped them secure $1.5 million in funding from Australian investors, on top of the $400,000 they raised a year ago.

Globally, if you play multiplayer PC games such as Counter-Strike, Day of Defeat, Half Life 2, Left 4 Dead or Team Fortress 2 online, the you may encounter ads served up from Australia by Pinion.

For those who run online game servers it is a chance to earn back the costs of running the server, while for advertisers it provides them access to the lucrative engaged 18-35 male demographic, which is increasingly spending time away from mainstream media.

Gamers can buy products from within the game window without being bumped out into a web browser. Advertisers so far have included companies such as KFC, Paramount, Boost Mobile and Budweiser.

“We identified a way to place advertising in video games in a different way to what anyone had tried in the past,” said Ringland, Pinion’s chief operating officer.

Others have tried and failed to create ad networks for video games.

Massive, acquired by Microsoft for between $US200 million and $US400 million in 2006, allowed game developers to write ad inventory into their code which could be changed dynamically. The ads appeared on objects such as billboards and storefronts.

Microsoft shut Massive down at the end of 2010, with the company struggling to gain traction because it required game developers to modify their code before the game’s release. Some publishers worried about putting gamers offside and said the revenue gained was too small.

Pinion currently only works with multiplayer games and it takes advantage of ad slots that have already been created in the games, so there’s no extra work for game developers.

Their ads appear in front of players -  3 million a month so far – on landing pages such as the welcome screen when they join a new game server. This slot was traditionally used by the server host to run server information and logos.

With ads built into the game content itself it is difficult to measure the success of an ad – and even what counts as one “view”. But Pinion can provide full analytics including the number of people who viewed an ad or engaged further i.e. by watching a video commercial.

They are in partnership talks with other game publishers and will soon launch Free Game Servers, a site where anyone can host online games for free, support by ads. Since there is a new revenue model game titles can be supported long after the publisher of the game has lost interest.

Pinion wasn’t an overnight success. The team had a few false starts and struggled to get media agencies onboard.

“All founders suffered hardships (debt, loss of assets, etc) to get the company up and running,” said Flores, Pinion’s chief executive.

“There was a three-month period where each month we told ourselves that it was the last month, that we couldn’t afford to pay any more server costs, but when the day came to cancel there would be a small glimmer of hope that would force us to keep going.”

Constant pitching to potential clients and partners paid dividends, as did advice from successful entrepreneurs such as Scott Farquhar from Atlassian and Dean McEvoy, founder of daily deals site Spreets.

But even after large investments the Pinion trio had a lot to learn, and were burnt by a bad deal in the US that “held the company back for a year”.

Atlassian CFO John Bruce-Smith has recently joined Pinion as its CFO, while Newmarket Capital founder Stuart Giglia has signed on as commercial director.

Early on in the company’s life a young man from Melbourne approached Pinion to let them know the servers they were running were rubbish and needed fixing. They met him instead of deleting his email – and he’s now the company’s head of community relations.

See your ad here

Pinion plans to keep at least its engineering base in Australia for as long as it can.

“Throughout our journey we’ve been offered money left right and centre from the US, including an accelerator program run by Microsoft,” said Ringland.

“Our aim has always been to keep the company Australian, but our trips to the US have shown us that on several levels, it’s all happening in the US and succeeding here will be very difficult.”

Pub brainwave puts Aussies in the game


{ story.summary|safe|escape }

  • Pinion co-founders (L-R) Daniel Ringland, Karl Flores and David Banham at the E3 gaming expo.

  • The show Dexter gets a plug via Pinion in Counter-Strike: Source.

  • A Pinion ad for the film Green Lantern appears in the game Counter-Strike.

  • A video ad for Hotmail in the game Day of Defeat.

See your ad here

Three Australian mates reckon they’ve worked out how to make advertising in video games work – and investors have backed them to the tune of just under $2 million.

It started as an idea in a pub three years ago, when Sydneysiders Daniel Ringland, Karl Flores and David Banham wondered whether they could create an advertising network targeting an audience of online gamers.

Tomorrow, Ringland, 30, and Flores, 32, are off to Seattle to set up Pinion‘s US office while Banham, 26, stays back in Australia to build out the engineering team (currently two people but increasing to four).

Early this year, after ups and downs turning the concept into reality, they signed Valve, one of the world’s largest game developers, as a partner. This has helped them secure $1.5 million in funding from Australian investors, on top of the $400,000 they raised a year ago.

Globally, if you play multiplayer PC games such as Counter-Strike, Day of Defeat, Half Life 2, Left 4 Dead or Team Fortress 2 online, the you may encounter ads served up from Australia by Pinion.

For those who run online game servers it is a chance to earn back the costs of running the server, while for advertisers it provides them access to the lucrative engaged 18-35 male demographic, which is increasingly spending time away from mainstream media.

Gamers can buy products from within the game window without being bumped out into a web browser. Advertisers so far have included companies such as KFC, Paramount, Boost Mobile and Budweiser.

“We identified a way to place advertising in video games in a different way to what anyone had tried in the past,” said Ringland, Pinion’s chief operating officer.

Others have tried and failed to create ad networks for video games.

Massive, acquired by Microsoft for between $US200 million and $US400 million in 2006, allowed game developers to write ad inventory into their code which could be changed dynamically. The ads appeared on objects such as billboards and storefronts.

Microsoft shut Massive down at the end of 2010, with the company struggling to gain traction because it required game developers to modify their code before the game’s release. Some publishers worried about putting gamers offside and said the revenue gained was too small.

Pinion currently only works with multiplayer games and it takes advantage of ad slots that have already been created in the games, so there’s no extra work for game developers.

Their ads appear in front of players -  3 million a month so far – on landing pages such as the welcome screen when they join a new game server. This slot was traditionally used by the server host to run server information and logos.

With ads built into the game content itself it is difficult to measure the success of an ad – and even what counts as one “view”. But Pinion can provide full analytics including the number of people who viewed an ad or engaged further i.e. by watching a video commercial.

They are in partnership talks with other game publishers and will soon launch Free Game Servers, a site where anyone can host online games for free, support by ads. Since there is a new revenue model game titles can be supported long after the publisher of the game has lost interest.

Pinion wasn’t an overnight success. The team had a few false starts and struggled to get media agencies onboard.

“All founders suffered hardships (debt, loss of assets, etc) to get the company up and running,” said Flores, Pinion’s chief executive.

“There was a three-month period where each month we told ourselves that it was the last month, that we couldn’t afford to pay any more server costs, but when the day came to cancel there would be a small glimmer of hope that would force us to keep going.”

Constant pitching to potential clients and partners paid dividends, as did advice from successful entrepreneurs such as Scott Farquhar from Atlassian and Dean McEvoy, founder of daily deals site Spreets.

But even after large investments the Pinion trio had a lot to learn, and were burnt by a bad deal in the US that “held the company back for a year”.

Atlassian CFO John Bruce-Smith has recently joined Pinion as its CFO, while Newmarket Capital founder Stuart Giglia has signed on as commercial director.

Early on in the company’s life a young man from Melbourne approached Pinion to let them know the servers they were running were rubbish and needed fixing. They met him instead of deleting his email – and he’s now the company’s head of community relations.

See your ad here

Pinion plans to keep at least its engineering base in Australia for as long as it can.

“Throughout our journey we’ve been offered money left right and centre from the US, including an accelerator program run by Microsoft,” said Ringland.

“Our aim has always been to keep the company Australian, but our trips to the US have shown us that on several levels, it’s all happening in the US and succeeding here will be very difficult.”

Consumer Penchant for On-the-Go Access to Online Games Drives the Cloud Gaming Market, According to New Report by Global Industry Analysts, Inc.

GIA announces the release of a comprehensive global report on Cloud Gaming markets. The global Cloud Gaming Services market is projected to reach US$2.0 billion by 2018, primarily driven by growing demand among consumers for easy on-the-go access to their favorite online games, rapid proliferation of smartphones and increasing use of these advanced mobile devices for accessing online entertainment content such as gaming. The ubiquity of online Cloud storage and key economic benefits of pay-as-you-go model will continue to boost consumer adoption of Cloud Gaming Services over the next few years. Robust demand from emerging markets, Asia-Pacific in particular, also augurs well for the future of this market.

San Jose, California (PRWEB) July 24, 2012 Follow us on LinkedIn – Cloud Gaming, as a technology is revolutionizing the gaming industry, bringing about drastic changes in the way digital games are distributed and consumed. Distribution of games over the Internet has been in vogue since early 2000s, allowing gamers to buy and download their favorite games. However, in the recent years, on-demand cloud based gaming services have grown in popularity as consumers increasingly opt for accessing and playing online games via the cloud rather than buying and downloading it onto their computers or other personal media player devices. This is primarily because of the fact that although games downloaded from the Internet provide gaming lovers a chance to gain complete control over their favorite gaming titles, the strategy involves several bottlenecks encountered in the form of limited storage and processing capabilities.

Although personal device capacities have increased over the years, they are still finite and can only store limited volume of games at a time. Consumers also find it difficult to move their downloaded games from device to another. These challenges are effectively met through cloud solutions such as, cloud storage services, which are designed to help consumers store and manage huge volumes of games in the cloud from a remote location, and cloud streaming services that provide games-as-a-service over the Internet without requiring users to download and store their games on physical computing devices.

The on-demand consumer cloud computing model helps transform the way customers gain access to and play online games. By offering a more cost-effective, less risky, and fundamentally faster alternative to gaming titles, cloud computing is poised to transform the economics of gaining access to a wide range of gaming applications in the next few years. Online games, which would have typically cost hundreds of dollars for sourcing, selecting, acquiring, installing and deploying, can now be licensed for less than $10 per month per individual, or can even be rented for than $5 for 3-5 day usage per individual. The pay-as-you-go business model of cloud gaming services will especially drive tremendous gains into the global cloud services market over the next few years.

The pay-as-you-go business model comes as a blessing for select consumer cluster, which typically prefers basic gaming titles and that too on a day-to-day basis, rather than investing heavily on the comprehensive package only to use advanced gaming features few times in a year. For instance, consumers preferring a single basic gaming title rather than buying an entire package of games especially benefit from this pay-as-u-go-model as they can pick their most favorite gaming title to be streamed and pay only for that rather than investing on an entire package, of which the game is a part of. Flexible cloud based business models allow online games to be even available at further discounted rates for members or special customers. Consumers are also provided with gaming software updates and updated versions without incurring any extra cost, as the responsibility of maintaining and upgrading available services is transferred to vendors.

Another key factor driving growth in the cloud services market is the ubiquity of cloud gaming. Cloud gaming services enable gamers to migrate current desktop residing gaming applications and storage to the cloud with the objective of enabling remote access and use of gaming applications beyond their home-based computers. For instance, by providing a remote virtual storage for gaming applications, cloud gaming services allow users to access their stored games on-demand as and when required even from their laptops, office workstations, or from a friend’s computer. Remote access and cloud services therefore go hand in hand. In recent years, cloud gaming service has taken the concept of remote access to another level by provisioning mobile access to gaming applications, by enabling gamers to access and play their games even from mobile devices such as Internet enabled feature phones, smartphones, and tablets.

Given the advantages of an ‘always on’ connectivity, providing anywhere and anytime access to data, the convergence of mobile devices such as smart phones with powerful cloud-computing services has and will continue to balloon in the future, as traditional business models crumble, paving way for the emergence of new generation of agile and efficient consumer business models. Rapid proliferation of smartphones, especially in developing markets such as China and India and increasing use of these devices for accessing online entertainment content indicates a strong potential in store for mobile cloud gaming services in general and for cloud gaming services overall.

As stated by the new market research report on Cloud Gaming, the US represents the largest regional market for Cloud Gaming accounting for a majority share in the total revenue generated. The European cloud gaming market is expected to surge at a CAGR of about 46.22% over the analysis period.

Major players in the global marketplace include BetStone Limited, Gaikai, Inc., G-cluster Global Corporation, OnLive, Inc., Playcast Media Systems Ltd., Spoon.net, Ubitus, Inc., among others.

The research report titled “Cloud Gaming: A Global Strategic Business Report” announced by Global Industry Analysts, Inc., provides a comprehensive review of market trends, issues, drivers, company profiles, mergers, acquisitions and other strategic industry activities. The report provides market estimates and projections by Annual Revenue (in US$ million) for major geographic markets including the US, Europe, and Rest of World.

For more details about this comprehensive market research report, please visit –

http://www.strategyr.com/Cloud_Gaming_Market_Report.asp

About Global Industry Analysts, Inc.

Global Industry Analysts, Inc., (GIA) is a leading publisher of off-the-shelf market research. Founded in 1987, the company currently employs over 800 people worldwide. Annually, GIA publishes more than 1300 full-scale research reports and analyzes 40,000+ market and technology trends while monitoring more than 126,000 Companies worldwide. Serving over 9500 clients in 27 countries, GIA is recognized today, as one of the world’s largest and reputed market research firms.

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Telephone: 408-528-9966

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